Virtuality — Part 2: Strategy and Technics


Virtuality part 2: Strategy and Technics

gettysburg “Muzzle-loading weapons sound awful primitive. They didn’t seem primitive to them. They were a new kind of infantry rifle that is deadly at 200 yards. That was a tremendous step forward. And the tactics were based on the old musket, which was accurate at about 60 feet. And they lined up shoulder to shoulder and moved against a position, and got blown down because they were using tactics with these very modern weapons. They were using the old-style tactics with very modern weapons. A few of the men realized that, Bedford Forrest for instance. He would never make a frontal attack on anything with this new weapon in their hands. But too many of them, including Robert E. Lee and U.S. Grant, followed the old tactics against these modern weapons. That’s why the casualties. There were 1,095,000 casualties in the Civil War. If today you had that same ratio, you’d have something like 10 million casualties, to give you some idea of what happened.”

- Shelby Foote, Civil War Historian

“They were using the old-style tactics with very modern weapons.” History has demonstrated again and again that military strategy and tactics lag the available technology. This is also true in business, where the adoption of advancements like the telephone, fax, email, the internet, software-as-a-service, virtual meetings, voice-over-IP telephony, web 2.0, social networking, viral marketing, etc, have been impeded by the previous generation’s management best practices.

As was the case with previous generations, today’s managers encumbered by yesterday’s vision face an insurmountable competitive disadvantage from those embracing the current technologies and practices available to them. At WebFeat, we were able to defeat companies as much as 100 times our size, simply because we were much more efficient and more productive than our bigger, slower, traditional adversaries. How was this possible?

Two words: opportunity cost.

When I attempt to recount the benefits of the virtual office to a stranger, I invariably am (preemptively) told that office rental is the #1 advantage. While office rent might make my top 100 list of reasons to go virtual, it is far from #1. Number 1 is the cost-effectiveness of my work force. Our virtual office easily yielded double the productivity of our traditional competitors. How?

strategytechnicstable1

This may not seem like a lot, but it adds up:

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27.5 years lost in a 100 person organization. That’s the equivalent of 27.5 extra people!

In addition, in my own experience, I found that my virtual employees tended to work longer hours than those in traditional offices. Typically, this ranged from 20% to 30% more than traditional employee office hours. Apparently this was attributable to two factors:

1. Virtual employees tend to make less of a distinction between work time and personal time than traditional employees, and…

2. It appears I am a hard task master

Whatever the reason, in our 100 - employee hypothetical company, this would add an additional 20 - 30 years annually, bringing the total to 47.5 - 57.5 years of additional productivity — a virtual company is 47.5% - 57.5% more productive than traditional companies.

But wait, there’s more!

While at work, my virtual employees tended to accomplish more than their traditional counterparts. This was due to a number of factors, including:

We held only a fraction of the number of meetings held by traditional companies

When we did hold meetings, they tended to be more productive — why?

Because most of our meetings were held via teleconference, the attendees tended to find silence or “dead air” to be uncomfortable. Consequently, our meetings tended to be short, and they followed classic successful meeting techniques, namely:

  • An agenda was published prior to the meeting, informing attendees what to be prepared to discuss
  • Brief minutes were taken, with action items captured, as well as persons responsible and deadlines
  • If follow-up meetings were required, these action items fed into the subsequent meeting

The bottom line is that we didn’t hold very many meetings, and we got a lot done in the meetings we did hold. Additionally, because our meetings produced cogent sets of action items, the work resulting from our meetings tended to yield better results

Finally, no one “dropped in” to our virtual offices to chat. Granted, some of our more gossipy employees made effective use of online chat, but they had little time to waste at the virtual water cooler. The moral of the story is that the success of the virtual office, as well as the traditional kind, is determined largely by the effectiveness of the management team. However, an effective team in a traditional office will be no match for an effective management team in a virtual office.

While it is difficult to gauge the amount of time consumed in useless meetings and water cooler gossip, consider that if it averages only 1 hour per day per employee, our virtual productivity edge over traditional offices grows to 60% - 70%! How many employees do you know that give up a mere hour each day in meetings and gossip?

Clearly, I’m not talking about moving the corporate performance needle a couple of percentage points. I am talking about a great big game-changing, Earth-moving, paradigm-shifting fundamental makeover that can enable your business to not only weather the current storm, but enable it to prosper and handily crush its competition.

More to come in part 3…

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  1. #1 by How I Lost 30 Pounds in 30 Days Without Diet at July 23rd, 2009

    Thanks for posting about this, I would love to read more about this topic.

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