Virtuality — Part 1: News for the Hard of Hearing


snl-news-hard-hearingIn “My New Old-Fashioned Company,” I’ve discussed what’s old about my company. Is there anything new?

Oh yes!

My company, gwabbit, is a 100% virtual office (as was my previous company). No bricks & mortar office whatsoever. Seriously!

I went virtual with my previous company, WebFeat, in 1998. If we were not the first successful100% global virtual company, we were certainly among the first. I must admit that, at the time, my motivation for going virtual was driven more by finance than vision. My little bootstrap start-up was short on cash and we simply could no longer afford our cool New York City office flat. Now, 11 years later, I can’t imagine running a business any other way.

When I would tell Silicon Valley colleagues about my virtual company, I found that most simply could not bend their heads around the notion of a 100% virtual office. The conversations usually went something like this:

Silicon Valley Colleague: “Where is your office?” (note: I had already explained to colleague that we were a virtual office)

Todd: “We don’t have an office”

Invariably, my colleague would ask the question again, slowly, as though either my hearing or cognition was impaired:

Silicon Valley Colleague: “where - is - your - office?” He asked, slowly

Todd: “We - don’t - have - an - office.” I repeated, slowly

One colleague actually asked the question a third time, making arm motions as though he were drawing a real office (ironically, in virtual space) as though I did not understand the question the first two times it was posited. It reminded me of when Garrett Morris did the News for the Hard of Hearing on Saturday Night Live by simply yelling at the camera.

Once my colleague reluctantly accepted the fact that I was serious about my virtual office, he would proceed to inform me why it could never succeed. The reasons included:

  • Virtual businesses can’t scale
  • You can’t supervise virtual office employees
  • You can’t have too many direct reports

I’ll knock these down one-by-one:

Virtual businesses can’t scale — invariably, my critics could never explain why they didn’t think a virtual business couldn’t scale. It just couldn’t scale. Like many reactions to the virtual company, this was an attempt to assign a rational sounding argument to an uncomfortable visceral feeling — we’ll talk more about feelings in later installments.

Despite the very worst prognostications of doom, our business somehow managed to scale anyway. At the time I sold my company, we had 40 employees. Still a small business, but I see no reason why it wouldn’t scale to 100 or 100,000

You can’t supervise virtual office employees — this is probably the most absurd argument against the virtual company — the notion that management can’t keep a close eye on their employees. My response to this is a simple one: why would you want to hire people that require supervision? Whether your business is virtual or not, don’t you want employees that can work and produce without supervision?

Too many direct reports – another one of the sillier arguments against the virtual office. More than one of my otherwise brilliant colleagues assumed that virtual officing somehow translated into every employee reporting directly to the virtual corner office. My experience has been that virtual offices utilize similar hierarchies and numbers of direct reports as their traditional counterparts.

So I’ve discussed some of the arguments against the virtual office – what are the arguments in favor?

There are many, which I’ll discuss in future installments, but the most compelling is this: in my 11 year experience with virtual officing, I found that a well-managed virtual office is 200% - 300% more efficient and productive than its traditional counterpart.

That’s right – not 20% or 30% more productive – 200% - 300% more productive!

In my decade long experience with WebFeat, our virtual David went up against not one, not two, but three traditional Goliaths. These companies had up to 100 times the number of employees as WebFeat, with relatively vast cash reserves. WebFeat, with no venture capital, funded entirely from operations, and fielding a comparatively puny cast of dozens, smacked down each of its Gigantor opponents, gaining top market share.

How – you might ask?

For the answer, stay tuned for the next installment of Virtuality!

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